A Runaway Trolley Of Odds And Ends


Open Your Mind. Porcelain goodness by Johnson Tsang. Trolley thoughts.
Open Your Mind. Porcelain goodness by Johnson Tsang.

This guy has a lot of other amazing pieces. Check out his blog here.

What do you say when someone takes your cheese? Leave my provologne.

Our very human relationships and abilities have been taken from us and sold back so that we are now dependent on strangers and therefore money for things few humans ever paid for until recently: food, shelter, clothing, entertainment, child care, cooking. Life itself has become a consumer item. - Charles Eisenstein
Our very human relationships and abilities have been taken from us and sold back so that we are now dependent on strangers and therefore money for things few humans ever paid for until recently: food, shelter, clothing, entertainment, child care, cooking. Life itself has become a consumer item. – Charles Eisenstein

No matter how much you push the envelope, it’ll still be stationery.

Scientific Fact - Brownies have never lasted long enough to know if they can go stale.
Scientific Fact – Brownies have never lasted long enough to know if they can go stale.

The trolley problem

Stolen from Steve W.Henslee


The trolley problem is a thought experiment in ethics. The general form of the problem is this: There is a runaway trolley barreling down the railway tracks. Ahead, on the tracks, there are five people tied up and unable to move. The trolley is headed straight for them. You are standing some distance off in the train yard, next to a lever. If you pull this lever, the trolley will switch to a different set of tracks. However, you notice that there is one person on the side track. You have two options: (1) Do nothing, and the trolley kills the five people on the main track. (2) Pull the lever, diverting the trolley onto the side track where it will kill one person. Which is the most ethical choice?

A utilitarian view asserts that it is obligatory to steer to the track with one man on it. According to simple utilitarianism, such a decision would be not only permissible, but, morally speaking, the better option (the other option being no action at all). An alternate viewpoint is that since moral wrongs are already in place in the situation, moving to another track constitutes a participation in the moral wrong, making one partially responsible for the death when otherwise no one would be responsible. An opponent of action may also point to the incommensurability of human lives. Under some interpretations of moral obligation, simply being present in this situation and being able to influence its outcome constitutes an obligation to participate. If this is the case, then deciding to do nothing would be considered an immoral act if one values five lives more than one.

Sometimes you have to move on without certain people. If they're meant to be in your life, they'll catch up.
Sometimes you have to move on without certain people. If they’re meant to be in your life, they’ll catch up.

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